• A Friend in Need, 1903
  • Turaida Castle, 2011 - Vezur
  • Landscape at Saint-Rémy, 1889
  • Entrance to harbor, Moonlight, 1881
  • Melancholy, 1874
  • Pugacheva Taxi, 2011 - Vezur
  • Breton Landscape - Fields by the Sea (Le Pouldu), 1894
  • Embrace aka Lovers II, 1917
  • When The Grass Was Greener, 2011 - Vezur
  • Midsummer Night, 1876
  • The Fog Warning, 1885
  • The Sower, 1888
  • Riegert aka Laima Clock, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Buffalo Trail, 1867
  • Conversion, 1912
  • The Red Vineyard, 1888
  • Evening in New York, 1890
  • Portrait Of The Painter Max Oppenheimer, 1910
  • Deauville, The Basin, 1892
  • Kelly Pool, 1903
  • The Last Supper, 1498
  • Haymaking, 2011 - Vezur
  • Big Red Buste, 1913
  • Summer Evening, 1886
  • Dancers V, 1877
  • Two Swans, 2011 - Vezur
  • Self Portrait with Hands on Chest, 1910
  • The Black Cat, 2011 - Vezur
  • Ligo Evening, 2011 - Vezur
  • Evocation
  • Walk Along The Sea, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Vines, 1902
  • Two Tahitian Women, 1899
  • The Vision after the Sermon, 1888
  • Richard Gallo and His Dog, at Petit Gennevilliers, 1884
  • Madame Pompador, 1915
  • The Sky, 2011 - Vezur
  • Woman with a Parasol and Small Child on a Sunlit Hillside,1874
  • Old Riga view, 2011 - Vezur
  • Poppies, 1886
  • Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1666
  • Cherubini, 1514
  • Dancers, 2011 - Vezur
  • Golden autumn, 2011 - Vezur
  • Wheat Field With Reaper And Sun, 1889
  • Café Terrace at Night, 1888
  • Contrasting Sounds, 1924
  • Strolling along the Seashore, 1909
  • Harvest Time, 1878
  • Orange Trees, 1878

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818

Caspar David Friedrich

Friedrich's greatest accomplishment was his ability to turn landscapes into a medium of physiological and spiritual biography. Here, he includes his own portrait within his landscape as a lay figure seen from behind, a device intended to invite the viewer to look at the world through the lens of the artist's own personal perception. Friedrich was captivated by the idea of encountering nature in solitude in deepest revines, as here on the pinncacle of a mountain, which was about as far away from urban civilization as a European man could get. In his later paintings, Friedrich will continue to stress that the very idea of "self-expression" had to be associated with physical and spiritual isolation. The Romantics believed that any artist who wanted to explore his own emotions, had necessarily to stand outside of the throng of money-making, political gimmickry, and urban noise in order to assert and maintain their positions.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.