• Deauville, The Basin, 1892
  • The Sky, 2011 - Vezur
  • Strolling along the Seashore, 1909
  • Marine bleue, 1893
  • Stehend Karyatide, 1913
  • The Magpie, 1869
  • Breton Landscape - Fields by the Sea (Le Pouldu), 1894
  • Boat in the Moonlight
  • Tram No 10, 2011 - Vezur
  • Recumbent Nude, 1917
  • Woman on a Terrace, 1857
  • Evening in New York, 1890
  • Two Swans, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Vines, 1902
  • Cherubini, 1514
  • Moonlight On The Loire Barbizon landscape
  • Lady with hat and feather boa, 1909
  • Harvest Time, 1878
  • View Of Venice Fog, 1881
  • Self Portrait with Arm Twisting above Head, 1910
  • Portrait Of Gabrielle Aka Young Girl With Flowers, 1900
  • Taking the Count, 1896
  • Lovers: Man and Woman I, 1914
  • A Carnival Evening, 1886
  • Study of a Head, 1913
  • Antibes Seen from the Salis Garden, 1888
  • Caricature Self Portrait, 1889
  • The Football Players, 1908
  • Big Red Buste, 1913
  • Four Trees, 1917
  • Breath of the Earth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Poppies at Argenteuil, 1873
  • The Man on the Balcony, 1880
  • The Starry Night, 1889
  • Dandelions, Ventas Rumba, 2011 - Vezur
  • Daisy fields, 2011 - Vezur
  • Ligo Evening, 2011 - Vezur
  • Yellow Circle, 1926
  • Pugacheva Taxi, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga in begining of 20th century, 2011 - Vezur
  • Jurmala (Sea Pearl), 2011 - Vezur
  • Opera House, 2011 - Vezur
  • Sun Walk Over The Bridge, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Large Bathers, 1906
  • Ophelia, 1905
  • Gloomy Situation, 1933
  • The Hope II, 1908
  • Riga Springtime, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Town In The Snow, 2011 - Vezur
  • Spring, 1879

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818

Caspar David Friedrich

Friedrich's greatest accomplishment was his ability to turn landscapes into a medium of physiological and spiritual biography. Here, he includes his own portrait within his landscape as a lay figure seen from behind, a device intended to invite the viewer to look at the world through the lens of the artist's own personal perception. Friedrich was captivated by the idea of encountering nature in solitude in deepest revines, as here on the pinncacle of a mountain, which was about as far away from urban civilization as a European man could get. In his later paintings, Friedrich will continue to stress that the very idea of "self-expression" had to be associated with physical and spiritual isolation. The Romantics believed that any artist who wanted to explore his own emotions, had necessarily to stand outside of the throng of money-making, political gimmickry, and urban noise in order to assert and maintain their positions.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.