• Conversion, 1912
  • The Sower, 1888
  • House of Blackheads, 2011 - Vezur
  • Poppy field in Giverny, 1885
  • Breath of the Earth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Interior, Woman at the Window, 1880
  • Self Portrait With Spread Fingers, 1909
  • Reclining Woman with Green Stockings (aka Adele Harms), 1917
  • Orange Trees, 1878
  • Old Riga view, 2011 - Vezur
  • Daisy fields, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Vines, 1902
  • Pugacheva Taxi, 2011 - Vezur
  • Autumn Sun I, 1912
  • Self Portrait with Arm Twisting above Head, 1910
  • Spring, 1879
  • Garden Study of the Vickers Children, 1884
  • Dancers in Blue, 1890
  • Portrait Of Gabrielle Aka Young Girl With Flowers, 1900
  • Idyll in Tahiti, 1901
  • Adam and Eve, 1526
  • Big Red Buste, 1913
  • The Thames below Westminster, 1871
  • Three Sisters at The Three Brothers, 2011 - Vezur
  • Vase Of Poppies, 1909
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Manao Tupapau (Spirit of the Dead Watching), 1892
  • Entrance to harbor, Moonlight, 1881
  • Breton Landscape - Fields by the Sea (Le Pouldu), 1894
  • The Druidess, 1893
  • Riga at Night, 2011 - Vezur
  • Moonlight On The Loire Barbizon landscape
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • The Hope II, 1908
  • Two Swans, 2011 - Vezur
  • Richard Gallo and His Dog, at Petit Gennevilliers, 1884
  • Lying act, 1917
  • Water Lilies, 1906
  • Madame Pompador, 1915
  • Dancers, 2011 - Vezur
  • Woman on a Terrace, 1857
  • Reclining Semi-Nude with Red Hat, 1910
  • Boat in the Moonlight
  • Le Pêcheur (The Fisherman), 1909
  • Negress, 1869
  • Paris Street - Rainy Weather, 1877
  • The Second Youth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Buckwheat Harvesters at Pont-Aven, 1888
  • Beatrice, 1897
  • Agony, 1912

Reclining Woman with Green Stockings (aka Adele Harms), 1917

Reclining Woman with Green Stockings (aka Adele Harms), 1917

Egon Schiele

As his reputation grew, Egon Schiele set his sights on a pair of sisters, Adele and Edith Harms, who lived opposite his studio. In 1915, Schiele married Edith, the finer-featured but more melancholic sister. While Edith didn’t want her husband using other models, she was convent educated and was embarrassed about posing herself. The few drawings he did make of her capture such defiance, but also a touching innocence. A couple of years into the marriage, when Edith had put on weight and no longer matched her husband’s lean and fragile ideal, other women – including her sister, Adele, – were once again invited to pose. Edith turned a blind eye. Unlike her younger sister, though, Adele wasn’t shy about posing in her underwear, and would later claim that her relationship with her brother-in-law had not been as chaste as it should have. Even today, a century after his death, the candour with which Schiele presented all of his women is sometimes unsettling. The intensity of his work lies in his engagement with his models. Their demeanour is sometimes confrontational, sometimes seductive, but always in control.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.