• House of Blackheads, 2011 - Vezur
  • Buddah In His Youth, 1904
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Spring, 1879
  • The Hope II, 1908
  • River Daugava, 2011 - Vezur
  • Ophelia, 1905
  • Kelly Pool, 1903
  • Anemones, 1909
  • Bridge of Europe, 1877
  • Lady with hat and feather boa, 1909
  • Cold Morning, 2011 - Vezur
  • Fields of Gold, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riegert aka Laima Clock, 2011 - Vezur
  • Poppies, 1886
  • Harvest Time, 1878
  • Sun Walk Over The Bridge, 2011 - Vezur
  • Boreas , 1903
  • Breton Landscape - Fields by the Sea (Le Pouldu), 1894
  • Four Trees, 1917
  • A Carnival Evening, 1886
  • Golden autumn, 2011 - Vezur
  • Evocation
  • Four Bathers, 1905
  • Two Little Girls On The Beach, 1895
  • Portrait of Ida Rubenstein, 1910
  • Three Sisters at The Three Brothers, 2011 - Vezur
  • Dandelions, Ventas Rumba, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Haymaker, 1886
  • Big Red Buste, 1913
  • Passion for Dance, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Rape of Europa, 1910
  • Poppy field in Giverny, 1885
  • Tree of Life, 1909
  • Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818
  • Summer Evening, 1886
  • Riga Springtime, 2011 - Vezur
  • Lane at the Jardin du Luxembourg, 1886
  • The Kiss, 1908
  • Richard Gallo and His Dog, at Petit Gennevilliers, 1884
  • Spanish Dancer, 1882
  • Morning in a Pine Forest, 1889
  • Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879
  • Madame Camus with a Fan, 1870
  • Marine bleue, 1893
  • San Giorgio Maggiore at Dusk, 1908
  • The Druidess, 1893
  • Autumn, 1877
  • Haymaking, 2011 - Vezur
  • Madame Pompador, 1915

Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879

Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879

Edgar Degas

This painting is interpreted as an anti-Semitic depiction of Jews in Paris, due especially to the exaggerated features and postures of the subjects. In Europe during the late 19th century there were fears of a financial conspiracy, in which Jewish financiers were thought to manipulate business for their gain. In fact, Degas's anti-Semitism may have been fueled by the bankruptcy of his own family's banking business, leaving Degas with some degree of resentment toward banking and those who symbolized it. Portraits, At the Stock Exchange also falls under the Impressionism movement of painting. Evidence for this can be seen in the painting's quick, somewhat abstract brushstrokes. This painting currently resides in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.