• Adele Bloch Bauer I, 1907
  • Autumn, 1877
  • Tree of Life, 1909
  • The Sky, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Town Charm, 2011 - Vezur
  • Café Terrace at Night, 1888
  • Summer Evening, 1886
  • Haymaking, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riegert aka Laima Clock, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Bather, 1879
  • Contrasting Sounds, 1924
  • The Man on the Balcony, 1880
  • Woman on a Terrace, 1857
  • Water Lilies, 1906
  • Self Portrait with Arm Twisting above Head, 1910
  • Lying act, 1917
  • Portrait of Josette, 1916
  • Lovers: Man and Woman I, 1914
  • Midsummer Festival, 2011 - Vezur
  • Garden Study of the Vickers Children, 1884
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Blue Dancers, 1899
  • Deauville, The Basin, 1892
  • The Large Bathers, 1906
  • Gloomy Situation, 1933
  • Old Riga view, 2011 - Vezur
  • Portrait of a Man, 1923
  • Water Lilies, Green Reflection, Left Part, 1923
  • Seacoast at Engure, 2011 - Vezur
  • A Carnival Evening, 1886
  • Moonlight, 1874
  • Portrait Of The Painter Max Oppenheimer, 1910
  • Chimney Sweeper, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Football Players, 1908
  • The Woman Friends, 1917
  • Seacoast at Kurzeme, 2011 - Vezur
  • Avenue of poplars at sunset, 1884
  • Mona Lisa, 1507
  • Foggy Morning, 2011 - Vezur
  • Impression, Sunrise, 1872
  • Two Little Girls On The Beach, 1895
  • Golden autumn, 2011 - Vezur
  • Dancers, 2011 - Vezur
  • A Friend in Need, 1903
  • Buckwheat Harvesters at Pont-Aven, 1888
  • Poppies, 1886
  • Dancers V, 1877
  • The End of Summer, 2011 -  Vezur
  • Riga at sunset, 2011 - Vezur
  • Girls, 2011 - Vezur

Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879

Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879

Edgar Degas

This painting is interpreted as an anti-Semitic depiction of Jews in Paris, due especially to the exaggerated features and postures of the subjects. In Europe during the late 19th century there were fears of a financial conspiracy, in which Jewish financiers were thought to manipulate business for their gain. In fact, Degas's anti-Semitism may have been fueled by the bankruptcy of his own family's banking business, leaving Degas with some degree of resentment toward banking and those who symbolized it. Portraits, At the Stock Exchange also falls under the Impressionism movement of painting. Evidence for this can be seen in the painting's quick, somewhat abstract brushstrokes. This painting currently resides in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.