• Flowers in a Vase, 1866
  • Spring, 1879
  • The Kiss, 1908
  • Woman on a Terrace, 1857
  • Reclining Semi-Nude with Red Hat, 1910
  • Richard Gallo and His Dog, at Petit Gennevilliers, 1884
  • Bridge of Europe, 1877
  • Poppies, 1886
  • Russian Belle and Landscape, 1904
  • Garden Study of the Vickers Children, 1884
  • Portrait of Felix Feneon, 1890
  • Four Trees, 1917
  • Recumbent Nude, 1917
  • Conversion, 1912
  • Beatrice, 1897
  • Taking the Count, 1896
  • The Buffalo Trail, 1867
  • Wheat Field With Reaper And Sun, 1889
  • Jurmala (Sea Pearl), 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga in Blue, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Riga, 2011 - Vezur
  • Flying people, 2011 - Vezur
  • Autumn, 1877
  • Tree of Life, 1909
  • The Midday Nap, 1894
  • Contrasting Sounds, 1924
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • Dandelions, Ventas Rumba, 2011 - Vezur
  • Water Lilies, Green Reflection, Left Part, 1923
  • Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818
  • Embrace aka Lovers II, 1917
  • Negress, 1869
  • Midsummer Night, 1876
  • Passion for Dance, 2011 - Vezur
  • Opera House, 2011 - Vezur
  • Blue cow, 2011 - Vezur
  • Mona Lisa, 1507
  • Yellow Circle, 1926
  • The Man on the Balcony, 1880
  • Dead Mother, 1910
  • Madame Pompador, 1915
  • Old Riga view, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga Springtime, 2011 - Vezur
  • Evocation
  • The Sower, 1888
  • The Star, 1878
  • Three Sisters at The Three Brothers, 2011 - Vezur
  • Breath of the Earth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Morning in a Pine Forest, 1889
  • The Second Youth, 2011 - Vezur

Marine bleue, 1893

Marine bleue, 1893

Georges Lacombe

Georges Lacombe took nature and shaped it with his brushes as deliberately as he carved it in wood. Marine bleue models shapeliness on canvas as well as any sculptor could chisel from marble. From the three primary colors, Lacombe created waves fringed with peacock feathered turbulence, flying up in pink mist, as though pointing toward their source in the clouds. The high horizon may be borrowed from the Japanese prints that Lacombe loved, but it suits Lacombe’s intentions. This, like Lacombe’s other paintings, is the coast of Finistere as he experienced it. To be sure, the drama was there in Camaret-sur-mer. The colors were Lacombe’s invention but the ocean crashing against jagged rocks was an unceasing natural drama.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.