• A Gust of Wind, 1883
  • Woman on a Terrace, 1857
  • Judith and the Head of Holofernes, 1901
  • Ballet Scene, 1879
  • Seacoast at Engure, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga at sunset, 2011 - Vezur
  • Adam and Eve, 1526
  • The End of Summer, 2011 -  Vezur
  • Garden Study of the Vickers Children, 1884
  • Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818
  • Two Tahitian Women, 1899
  • Avenue of poplars at sunset, 1884
  • Anna Pavlova in the Ballet Sylphyde, 1909
  • A Friend in Need, 1903
  • Passion for Dance, 2011 - Vezur
  • Vase Of Poppies, 1909
  • Valdemara street, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897
  • Marine bleue, 1893
  • Seacoast at Kurzeme, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Riga, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Man on the Balcony, 1880
  • The Star, 1878
  • The Black Cat, 2011 - Vezur
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • Negress, 1869
  • Lovers: Man and Woman I, 1914
  • The Sky, 2011 - Vezur
  • Midsummer Night, 1876
  • View Of Venice Fog, 1881
  • Evening on Volga, 1888
  • Summer Evening, 1886
  • Conversion, 1912
  • Idyll in Tahiti, 1901
  • House of Blackheads, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Vines, 1902
  • Anemones, 1909
  • Four Bathers, 1905
  • Spanish Dancer, 1882
  • Lady with hat and feather boa, 1909
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Le Pêcheur (The Fisherman), 1909
  • The Second Youth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Antibes Seen from the Salis Garden, 1888
  • Sun Walk Over The Bridge, 2011 - Vezur
  • Buckwheat Harvesters at Pont-Aven, 1888
  • Standing Girl in a Plaid Garment, 1909
  • Sunflowers, 1888
  • Cherubini, 1514
  • Girls, 2011 - Vezur

Marine bleue, 1893

Marine bleue, 1893

Georges Lacombe

Georges Lacombe took nature and shaped it with his brushes as deliberately as he carved it in wood. Marine bleue models shapeliness on canvas as well as any sculptor could chisel from marble. From the three primary colors, Lacombe created waves fringed with peacock feathered turbulence, flying up in pink mist, as though pointing toward their source in the clouds. The high horizon may be borrowed from the Japanese prints that Lacombe loved, but it suits Lacombe’s intentions. This, like Lacombe’s other paintings, is the coast of Finistere as he experienced it. To be sure, the drama was there in Camaret-sur-mer. The colors were Lacombe’s invention but the ocean crashing against jagged rocks was an unceasing natural drama.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.