• The Man on the Balcony, 1880
  • San Giorgio Maggiore at Dusk, 1908
  • Woman on a Terrace, 1857
  • Beatrice, 1897
  • Cherubini, 1514
  • Agony, 1912
  • The Fog Warning, 1885
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Entrance to harbor, Moonlight, 1881
  • The Vines, 1902
  • An Angel
  • Two Tahitian Women, 1899
  • Head Of A Woman With A Hat, 1907
  • Old Riga, 2011 - Vezur
  • Seacoast at Kurzeme, 2011 - Vezur
  • Chimney Sweeper, 2011 - Vezur
  • Self Portrait With Spread Fingers, 1909
  • Anna Pavlova in the Ballet Sylphyde, 1909
  • Bridge of Europe, 1877
  • Evening on Volga, 1888
  • Rosina, 1878
  • Lane at the Jardin du Luxembourg, 1886
  • Pugacheva Taxi, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Midday Nap, 1894
  • Dancers in Blue, 1890
  • Conversion, 1912
  • Walk Along The Sea, 2011 - Vezur
  • Four Bathers, 1905
  • The Vision after the Sermon, 1888
  • Riga in begining of 20th century, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga at sunset, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Hope II, 1908
  • Garden Study of the Vickers Children, 1884
  • Russian Belle and Landscape, 1904
  • The Buffalo Trail, 1867
  • Old Town Charm, 2011 - Vezur
  • Winter, 2011 - Vezur
  • Interior, Woman at the Window, 1880
  • Poppy field in Giverny, 1885
  • Turaida Castle, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Red Vineyard, 1888
  • Dancers in Riga Heart, 2011 - Vezur
  • Reclining Semi-Nude with Red Hat, 1910
  • Ballet Scene, 1879
  • House of Blackheads, 2011 - Vezur
  • Dead Mother, 1910
  • Blue cow, 2011 - Vezur
  • Mona Lisa, 1507
  • Jurmala (Sea Pearl), 2011 - Vezur
  • Buddah In His Youth, 1904

Marine bleue, 1893

Marine bleue, 1893

Georges Lacombe

Georges Lacombe took nature and shaped it with his brushes as deliberately as he carved it in wood. Marine bleue models shapeliness on canvas as well as any sculptor could chisel from marble. From the three primary colors, Lacombe created waves fringed with peacock feathered turbulence, flying up in pink mist, as though pointing toward their source in the clouds. The high horizon may be borrowed from the Japanese prints that Lacombe loved, but it suits Lacombe’s intentions. This, like Lacombe’s other paintings, is the coast of Finistere as he experienced it. To be sure, the drama was there in Camaret-sur-mer. The colors were Lacombe’s invention but the ocean crashing against jagged rocks was an unceasing natural drama.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.