• Riga in begining of 20th century, 2011 - Vezur
  • Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1666
  • Self Portrait With Spread Fingers, 1909
  • Marine bleue, 1893
  • The End of Summer, 2011 -  Vezur
  • A Friend in Need 2, 1903
  • Negress, 1869
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Spring, 1879
  • Antibes Seen from the Salis Garden, 1888
  • Buckwheat Harvesters at Pont-Aven, 1888
  • Water Lilies, 1906
  • Flowers in a Vase, 1866
  • The Banks of the River at Veneux, 1881
  • Recumbent Nude, 1917
  • River bank, 2011 - Vezur
  • Russian Belle and Landscape, 1904
  • Big Red Buste, 1913
  • Anna Pavlova in the Ballet Sylphyde, 1909
  • Breton Landscape - Fields by the Sea (Le Pouldu), 1894
  • The Druidess, 1893
  • Strolling along the Seashore, 1909
  • Impression, Sunrise, 1872
  • Agony, 1912
  • Dancers V, 1877
  • Taking the Count, 1896
  • Harlequin, 1890
  • Contrasting Sounds, 1924
  • Lady of the Flowers, 1895
  • Sun Walk Over The Bridge, 2011 - Vezur
  • Blue Dancers, 1899
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • The Second Youth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Town Charm, 2011 - Vezur
  • Rosina, 1878
  • Ophelia, 1905
  • Columbus Avenue, Rainy Day, 1885
  • Sunflowers, 1888
  • Foggy Morning, 2011 - Vezur
  • Seacoast at Engure, 2011 - Vezur
  • Poppies at Argenteuil, 1873
  • River Daugava, 2011 - Vezur
  • Two Little Girls On The Beach, 1895
  • Lady with hat and feather boa, 1909
  • Woman with Black Hat, 1909
  • Lane at the Jardin du Luxembourg, 1886
  • Judith and the Head of Holofernes, 1901
  • Riga at Night, 2011 - Vezur
  • Pugacheva Taxi, 2011 - Vezur
  • Adele Bloch Bauer I, 1907

Dandelions, Ventas Rumba, 2011 - Vezur

Dandelions, Ventas Rumba, 2011 - Vezur

Venta Rapid (Latvian: Ventas rumba) is a rapid on the Venta River in Kuldīga, Latvia. This is the widest rapid in Europe – 249 meters and up to 270 meters during spring floods. Its height is 1.80–2.20 meters and it changes depending on the water level in the river. It also features the widest waterfall in Europe. It's 110 meters wide, but only two meters high. In the stone canals are carved. They were used to catch salmon and sturgeon. If the fishes didn't make the jump up the river they would be swept back by the current, into the canal and be caught in hanging baskets.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.