• Evocation
  • Portrait of a European Lady in Japanese Costume
  • Standing Girl in a Plaid Garment, 1909
  • Anna Pavlova in the Ballet Sylphyde, 1909
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • An Angel
  • Adam and Eve, 1526
  • Autumn, 1877
  • Reclining Woman with Green Stockings (aka Adele Harms), 1917
  • Lovers: Man and Woman I, 1914
  • Lady with fan, 1918
  • Dancers in Blue, 1890
  • Horses, 2011 - Vezur
  • Café Terrace at Night, 1888
  • Boreas , 1903
  • Stehend Karyatide, 1913
  • Riga at sunset, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Town Charm, 2011 - Vezur
  • Flying people, 2011 - Vezur
  • Madame Pompador, 1915
  • River bank, 2011 - Vezur
  • Spring, 1879
  • Midsummer Festival, 2011 - Vezur
  • Breath of the Earth, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Druidess, 1893
  • Harlequin, 1890
  • Evening on Volga, 1888
  • Moonlight, 1874
  • The End of Summer, 2011 -  Vezur
  • Antibes Seen from the Salis Garden, 1888
  • Portrait of Ida Rubenstein, 1910
  • Riga Springtime, 2011 - Vezur
  • Negress, 1869
  • Deauville, The Basin, 1892
  • The Magpie, 1869
  • Saint John, 1892
  • Lane at the Jardin du Luxembourg, 1886
  • Manao Tupapau (Spirit of the Dead Watching), 1892
  • Strolling along the Seashore, 1909
  • Two Swans, 2011 - Vezur
  • Study of a Figure Outdoors (Facing Right), 1886
  • Riga in begining of 20th century, 2011 - Vezur
  • Adele Bloch Bauer I, 1907
  • The Fog Warning, 1885
  • Self Portrait With Spread Fingers, 1909
  • Embrace aka Lovers II, 1917
  • The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897
  • The Large Bathers, 1906
  • Four Bathers, 1905
  • Dancers, 2011 - Vezur

A Carnival Evening, 1886

A Carnival Evening, 1886

Henri Rousseau

In August of 1886, the Société des Indépendants, a group of artists including George Seurat and Paul Signac, mounted an exhibition that was revolutionary. For a fee of fifteen francs any artist, with or without academic training, could participate and exhibitors did not have to pass a jury selection or meet any stylistic criteria. “Carnival Evening” was Rousseau’s submission to this exhibition, and it created a sensation. The precise, yet cartoon-like treatment of the trees, clouds, and people brought Rousseau critical ridicule, but the unusual composition of the small harlequin figures in front of a forest of barren winter trees appealed to the Post-Impressionists.

Including a perfect circle in his paintings became one of Rousseau’s trademarks. Here it appears as a moon, but it can also represent the sun or even a soccer ball in other paintings.

Painting`s original is located at Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.