• The End of Summer, 2011 -  Vezur
  • Self Portrait with Arm Twisting above Head, 1910
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • Ballet Scene, 1879
  • Melancholy, 1874
  • Riegert aka Laima Clock, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Druidess, 1893
  • The Banks of the River at Veneux, 1881
  • Goldau, 1843
  • Adam and Eve, 1526
  • Breton Landscape - Fields by the Sea (Le Pouldu), 1894
  • Idyll in Tahiti, 1901
  • Morning in a Pine Forest, 1889
  • Four Bathers, 1905
  • Riga at Night, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga at sunset, 2011 - Vezur
  • Poppies at Argenteuil, 1873
  • Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879
  • Buddah In His Youth, 1904
  • River Daugava, 2011 - Vezur
  • Madame Pompador, 1915
  • Flowers in a Vase, 1866
  • When The Grass Was Greener, 2011 - Vezur
  • Lady with hat and feather boa, 1909
  • Manao Tupapau (Spirit of the Dead Watching), 1892
  • Two Little Girls On The Beach, 1895
  • Study of a Figure Outdoors (Facing Right), 1886
  • Russian Belle and Landscape, 1904
  • Dead Mother, 1910
  • Forest, 2011 - Vezur
  • Bridge of Europe, 1877
  • Chimney Sweeper, 2011 - Vezur
  • Portrait of Felix Feneon, 1890
  • Music-I, 1895
  • Nude Egyptian Girl, 1891
  • The Green Dancer, 1880
  • Cherubini, 1514
  • Portrait of Josette, 1916
  • Four Trees, 1917
  • Self Portrait with Hands on Chest, 1910
  • Evening on Volga, 1888
  • Moonlight, 1874
  • Evening in New York, 1890
  • The Boat, 2011 - Vezur
  • Marine bleue, 1893
  • Riga in begining of 20th century, 2011 - Vezur
  • Independence Day, 2011 - Vezur
  • Entrance to harbor, Moonlight, 1881
  • Harlequin, 1890
  • Dancers V, 1877

Paul Ranson

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864-1909) was a French painter and writer. He was born in Limoges and studied at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs there before moving to Paris and transferring to the Académie Julian in 1886. There he met Paul Sérusier in 1888. Subsequently from 1890 he became a member and a creative leader of the Nabis group. They gathered at his studio in the Boulevarde du Montparnasse each Saturday. Ranson tended to favour exotic, symbolic or quasi-religious motifs rather than subjects observed... Read more