• Cagnes Landscape
  • Golden autumn, 2011 - Vezur
  • Self Portrait with Hands on Chest, 1910
  • Flower Clouds, 1903
  • Idyll in Tahiti, 1901
  • Riga at Night, 2011 - Vezur
  • Orange Trees, 1878
  • Harvest Time, 1878
  • Young Man at His Window, 1875
  • Bridge of Europe, 1877
  • House of Blackheads, 2011 - Vezur
  • Chimney Sweeper, 2011 - Vezur
  • Stork, 2011 - Vezur
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Woman on a Terrace, 1857
  • Turaida Castle, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Fog Warning, 1885
  • Walk Along The Sea, 2011 - Vezur
  • Cold Morning, 2011 - Vezur
  • Café Terrace at Night, 1888
  • An Angel
  • Melancholy, 1874
  • Marine bleue, 1893
  • Boreas , 1903
  • Pugacheva Taxi, 2011 - Vezur
  • Contrasting Sounds, 1924
  • Midsummer Night, 1876
  • Water Lilies, Green Reflection, Left Part, 1923
  • Poppy field in Giverny, 1885
  • Jurmala (Sea Pearl), 2011 - Vezur
  • Horses, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Veteran in a New Field, 1865
  • Reclining Woman with Green Stockings (aka Adele Harms), 1917
  • Nude Egyptian Girl, 1891
  • The Woman Friends, 1917
  • Dancers in Riga Heart, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Kiss, 1908
  • Tree of Life, 1909
  • Sun Walk Over The Bridge, 2011 - Vezur
  • Garden Study of the Vickers Children, 1884
  • Avenue of poplars at sunset, 1884
  • Riga Springtime, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Riga view, 2011 - Vezur
  • Poppies at Argenteuil, 1873
  • Seacoast at Engure, 2011 - Vezur
  • Columbus Avenue, Rainy Day, 1885
  • Lady with fan, 1918
  • The Vines, 1902
  • Recumbent Nude, 1917
  • Mona Lisa, 1507

Paul Ranson

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864-1909) was a French painter and writer. He was born in Limoges and studied at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs there before moving to Paris and transferring to the Académie Julian in 1886. There he met Paul Sérusier in 1888. Subsequently from 1890 he became a member and a creative leader of the Nabis group. They gathered at his studio in the Boulevarde du Montparnasse each Saturday. Ranson tended to favour exotic, symbolic or quasi-religious motifs rather than subjects observed... Read more