• The Veteran in a New Field, 1865
  • Winter, 2011 - Vezur
  • Sun Walk Over The Bridge, 2011 - Vezur
  • Kelly Pool, 1903
  • Pugacheva Taxi, 2011 - Vezur
  • Portrait of Ida Rubenstein, 1910
  • Flower Clouds, 1903
  • Dance Festival, 2011 - Vezur
  • Valdemara street, 2011 - Vezur
  • Evening on Volga, 1888
  • Evocation
  • The End of Summer, 2011 -  Vezur
  • Portrait of Felix Feneon, 1890
  • Russian Belle and Landscape, 1904
  • Study for The Spanish Dance, 1882
  • Columbus Avenue, Rainy Day, 1885
  • Stehend Karyatide, 1913
  • When The Grass Was Greener, 2011 - Vezur
  • Nabis Landscape, 1890
  • The Second Youth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Impression, Sunrise, 1872
  • San Giorgio Maggiore at Dusk, 1908
  • Stork, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Fog Warning, 1885
  • The Starry Night, 1889
  • Bridge of Europe, 1877
  • Reclining Woman with Green Stockings (aka Adele Harms), 1917
  • The Banks of the River at Veneux, 1881
  • Café Terrace at Night, 1888
  • The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897
  • Independence Day, 2011 - Vezur
  • Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879
  • Winter at the seaside, 2011 - Vezur
  • Autumn Sun I, 1912
  • Old Riga, 2011 - Vezur
  • Young Man at His Window, 1875
  • The Boat, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga at Night, 2011 - Vezur
  • Girls, 2011 - Vezur
  • Foggy Morning, 2011 - Vezur
  • Water Lilies, 1906
  • Opera House, 2011 - Vezur
  • An Angel
  • Study of a Head, 1913
  • House of Blackheads, 2011 - Vezur
  • Paris Street - Rainy Weather, 1877
  • Water Lilies, Green Reflection, Left Part, 1923
  • Lane at the Jardin du Luxembourg, 1886
  • Old Town In The Snow, 2011 - Vezur
  • Four Bathers, 1905

Paul Ranson

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864-1909) was a French painter and writer. He was born in Limoges and studied at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs there before moving to Paris and transferring to the Académie Julian in 1886. There he met Paul Sérusier in 1888. Subsequently from 1890 he became a member and a creative leader of the Nabis group. They gathered at his studio in the Boulevarde du Montparnasse each Saturday. Ranson tended to favour exotic, symbolic or quasi-religious motifs rather than subjects observed... Read more