• The Magpie, 1869
  • Two Tahitian Women, 1899
  • Four Bathers, 1905
  • Old Town Charm, 2011 - Vezur
  • Dead Mother, 1910
  • Dancers, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Kiss, 1908
  • Dandelions, Ventas Rumba, 2011 - Vezur
  • Morning in a Pine Forest, 1889
  • The Banks of the River at Veneux, 1881
  • The Veteran in a New Field, 1865
  • Young Man at His Window, 1875
  • Woman on a Terrace, 1857
  • Winter, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga Springtime, 2011 - Vezur
  • Café Terrace at Night, 1888
  • Antibes Seen from the Salis Garden, 1888
  • The Starry Night, 1889
  • Mona Lisa, 1507
  • A Friend in Need, 1903
  • Blue Dancers, 1899
  • Kelly Pool, 1903
  • The Man on the Balcony, 1880
  • The Second Youth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Vase Of Poppies, 1909
  • The Haymaker, 1886
  • River Daugava, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Vision after the Sermon, 1888
  • A Gust of Wind, 1883
  • Contrasting Sounds, 1924
  • The Large Bathers, 1906
  • Embrace aka Lovers II, 1917
  • An Angel
  • View Of Venice Fog, 1881
  • Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818
  • Recumbent Nude, 1917
  • Evocation
  • Independence Day, 2011 - Vezur
  • Fields of Gold, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Hope II, 1908
  • Flowers in a Vase, 1866
  • Harlequin, 1890
  • La Sybille, 1891
  • Richard Gallo and His Dog, at Petit Gennevilliers, 1884
  • Seacoast at Kurzeme, 2011 - Vezur
  • Dancers in Blue, 1890
  • Flying people, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Town Back In 30's, 2011 - Vezur
  • Reclining Woman with Green Stockings (aka Adele Harms), 1917
  • Lane at the Jardin du Luxembourg, 1886

Paul Ranson

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864-1909) was a French painter and writer. He was born in Limoges and studied at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs there before moving to Paris and transferring to the Académie Julian in 1886. There he met Paul Sérusier in 1888. Subsequently from 1890 he became a member and a creative leader of the Nabis group. They gathered at his studio in the Boulevarde du Montparnasse each Saturday. Ranson tended to favour exotic, symbolic or quasi-religious motifs rather than subjects observed... Read more