• Golden autumn, 2011 - Vezur
  • Evening on Volga, 1888
  • Antibes Seen from the Salis Garden, 1888
  • View Of Venice Fog, 1881
  • Standing Girl in a Plaid Garment, 1909
  • Self Portrait with Hands on Chest, 1910
  • Evening in New York, 1890
  • Taking the Count, 1896
  • Chimney Sweeper, 2011 - Vezur
  • When The Grass Was Greener, 2011 - Vezur
  • Countryside, 2011 - Vezur
  • Woman with Black Hat, 1909
  • The Hope II, 1908
  • The Red Vineyard, 1888
  • The Vision after the Sermon, 1888
  • Independence Day, 2011 - Vezur
  • Pugacheva Taxi, 2011 - Vezur
  • Wheat Field With Reaper And Sun, 1889
  • Agony, 1912
  • Portrait of Josette, 1916
  • A Friend in Need, 1903
  • Tree of Life, 1909
  • Two Little Girls On The Beach, 1895
  • Moonlight On The Loire Barbizon landscape
  • Flying people, 2011 - Vezur
  • Avenue of poplars at sunset, 1884
  • Autumn, 1877
  • Buckwheat Harvesters at Pont-Aven, 1888
  • The Fog Warning, 1885
  • Impression, Sunrise, 1872
  • Flower Clouds, 1903
  • Cagnes Landscape
  • A Carnival Evening, 1886
  • The Rape of Europa, 1910
  • San Giorgio Maggiore at Dusk, 1908
  • Bridge of Europe, 1877
  • The Large Bathers, 1906
  • Jurmala (Sea Pearl), 2011 - Vezur
  • Two Tahitian Women, 1899
  • The Star, 1878
  • The Kiss, 1908
  • Poppies at Argenteuil, 1873
  • Saint John, 1892
  • Idyll in Tahiti, 1901
  • Sunflowers, 1888
  • Old Town Back In 30's, 2011 - Vezur
  • Forest, 2011 - Vezur
  • Woman with a Parasol and Small Child on a Sunlit Hillside,1874
  • Mother And Child Aka Madonna, 1908
  • Water Lilies, 1906

Paul Ranson

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864-1909) was a French painter and writer. He was born in Limoges and studied at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs there before moving to Paris and transferring to the Académie Julian in 1886. There he met Paul Sérusier in 1888. Subsequently from 1890 he became a member and a creative leader of the Nabis group. They gathered at his studio in the Boulevarde du Montparnasse each Saturday. Ranson tended to favour exotic, symbolic or quasi-religious motifs rather than subjects observed... Read more