• Girls, 2011 - Vezur
  • Sunflowers, 1888
  • The Red Vineyard, 1888
  • Interior, Woman at the Window, 1880
  • The Sky, 2011 - Vezur
  • Evening on Volga, 1888
  • Portrait Of The Painter Max Oppenheimer, 1910
  • Study of a Head, 1913
  • When The Grass Was Greener, 2011 - Vezur
  • Jurmala (Sea Pearl), 2011 - Vezur
  • Nabis Landscape, 1890
  • Two Little Girls On The Beach, 1895
  • Morning in a Pine Forest, 1889
  • Poppies, 1886
  • Golden autumn, 2011 - Vezur
  • Boat in the Moonlight
  • The Woman Friends, 1917
  • The Fog Warning, 1885
  • Poppy field in Giverny, 1885
  • The Kiss, 1908
  • Opera House, 2011 - Vezur
  • Riga at Night, 2011 - Vezur
  • Flower Clouds, 1903
  • Old Town Charm, 2011 - Vezur
  • Lying act, 1917
  • Judith and the Head of Holofernes, 1901
  • Cagnes Landscape
  • Strolling along the Seashore, 1909
  • Mona Lisa, 1507
  • Blue cow, 2011 - Vezur
  • Adele Bloch Bauer I, 1907
  • Big Red Buste, 1913
  • Portrait of a European Lady in Japanese Costume
  • Self Portrait with Arm Twisting above Head, 1910
  • Harlequin, 1890
  • A Friend in Need, 1903
  • The Hope II, 1908
  • Head Of A Woman With A Hat, 1907
  • The Second Youth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Daisy fields, 2011 - Vezur
  • Valdemara street, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Boat, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Large Bathers, 1906
  • Vase Of Poppies, 1909
  • Self Portrait With Spread Fingers, 1909
  • Le Pêcheur (The Fisherman), 1909
  • Gloomy Situation, 1933
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • An Angel

Paul Ranson

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864 - 1909)

Paul Ranson (1864-1909) was a French painter and writer. He was born in Limoges and studied at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs there before moving to Paris and transferring to the Académie Julian in 1886. There he met Paul Sérusier in 1888. Subsequently from 1890 he became a member and a creative leader of the Nabis group. They gathered at his studio in the Boulevarde du Montparnasse each Saturday. Ranson tended to favour exotic, symbolic or quasi-religious motifs rather than subjects observed... Read more